Male understanding the relationship between Understanding the Relationship Between Smoking and Male Fertility with help of family

Understanding the Relationship Between Smoking and Male Fertility

Ask any regular smoker or chewer of tobacco, and most will agree it takes only a short amount of time to become addicted to nicotine. A nicotine habit like smoking has been linked to a multitude of adverse health issues and those using tobacco are highly encouraged to stop. Keep reading below to understand the relationship between  smoking and male fertility.

Understanding the Relationship Between Smoking and Male Fertility

The relationship between nicotine and male infertility has sparked interest with many researchers. It is estimated 15 percent of couples face some form of infertility when trying to have children, and according to certain studies, cigarette smoking can have a damaging effect on the volume, sperm count, and ability of sperm to move properly to reach an egg.

Studies also confirm DNA fragmentation is increased in the sperm of smokers. This could play a role in complications with embryo development as well as be a contributing factor to increased miscarriage rates. Furthermore, researchers have suggested the number of cigarettes a male smokes on a daily basis is related to the impairment of semen quality.

A Closer Look at Smoking and Male Fertility

In an attempt to explain the connection, researchers suggest smokers have lower zinc levels than nonsmokers and this plays a role in the irregular semen parameters. Researchers also suggest men who smoke are exposed to metals that contain toxins, which can lead to the development of high levels of cadmium and lead, both of which have been linked to decreased fertility.

Also noteworthy is the fact that smoking can have adverse effects on the success of certain techniques like in-vitro fertilization and intracytoplasmic sperm injection. Couples seeking assisted reproduction techniques should take into account the negative impact smoking plays on male fertility.

In addition to the aforementioned effects, researchers claim exposure to cigarettes in utero may influence a man’s eventual fertility in the future. This means if a male is born to a mother who smoked during her pregnancy, he may be at risk for poor sperm health and may have difficulty conceiving a child later on in life.

Conclusion

Reduced semen health doesn’t always mean infertility but evidence points to the fact that men who are having trouble conceiving should be encouraged to stop smoking in order to optimize their fertility outcomes. If a man is already at risk for infertility, smoking may be the factor that determines his ability to conceive or not conceive a child. Dropping the habit will improve a couple’s chances of having a child.

Georgia Vascular Institute is a referral center that can help with many types of health concerns. We can help with veins, fibroids, infertility, migraines, osteoporosis, cancer treatment, foot and leg ulcers, and many other conditions. Contact us anytime to learn more about how interventional radiology can help you. 

Mother and daughter discussing period and uterine fibroids

Tips for Talking With Your Daughter About Periods and Uterine Fibroids

For many young girls, understanding what’s happening with their bodies while going through puberty is very important to them. A planned outing or a special weekend getaway can be an ideal opportunity to discuss such personal changes.

Girls should know what to expect when puberty hits, and if possible, they should feel confident in the relationship they have with their parents to ensure they feel comfortable sharing personal information and have intimate and private conversations. A young girl is likely to have a ton of questions regarding her period, including lots of inquiries about pads, tampons, and panty liners. There is a lot of helpful information online that can make teaching how to insert a tampon quite simple.

What Happens During Puberty for a Girl?

During puberty, the body will go through many changes, with most girls starting their periods between nine and 16 years of age. It’s during this time that the ovaries begin to release eggs, and as a result of this, a girl’s body will build up a thick layer of tissue in the uterus. Unless a sperm fertilizes the egg, the thick tissue is not needed and will then turn into a blood-like fluid and flow out of the vagina.

Talking About Health Concerns, Especially Fibroids

Many young girls have no idea what signs to watch for in regards to health concerns and puberty. When talking about periods this is a good time to educate your daughter on uterine fibroids. Early knowledge and awareness can lower the risk of medical problems later in life. A large number of girls with uterine fibroids don’t show any symptoms, but there are some who experience pain with their period along with heavy and prolonged bleeding. This is why you should encourage your daughter to inform you of any pain and heavy bleeding when she’s on her period. Uterine fibroids don’t normally lead to fatal outcomes, but they can cause an immense amount of pain and sometimes require surgery to have them removed. The sooner these fibroids are diagnosed, the sooner they can be treated.

It may not be a topic you want to discuss over dinner, but periods and fibroids are definitely subjects you and your daughter need to discuss.

Georgia Vascular Institute is a referral center that can help with many types of health concerns. We can help with veins, fibroids, infertility, migraines, osteoporosis, cancer treatment, foot and leg ulcers, and many other conditions. Contact us anytime to learn more about how interventional radiology can help you.