poor circulation circulatory problems

The Symptoms and Effects of Poor Circulation

Poor circulation can be a major problem for many people today, especially when other medical problems are present. Often, people don’t even realize that they have circulatory problems because the symptoms aren’t very well known. This blog focuses on helping you identify the signs of poor circulation — and when you should reach out for help.

The Signs of Poor Circulation: What to Watch Out For

Some of the signs of poor circulation are quite hard to deal with while others may be more subtle, at least in the beginning. The most common indicators that you may be suffering from poor circulation include:

  • Numbness in your hands and/or feet
  • A “pins and needles” sensation in your hands and/or feet
  • Your hands and/or feet feel colder than the rest of your body
  • Your feet and/or ankles are swollen
  • You’re having memory problems or can’t focus
  • You feel run-down or even exhausted all the time
  • You have joint pain
  • You experience muscle cramps often
  • Your skin color changes in some areas of your body
  • Your skin’s texture changes, becoming thicker and tougher in some places

It’s quite common to have several of these symptoms simultaneously. It’s not unusual for the symptoms to be worse at some times than others. However, improvements are usually short-lived unless you seek out treatment for your circulation problems.

How Poor Circulation Can Affect Your Life — and When to Get Help

Poor circulation can impact your life in many negative ways. You may find that untreated circulatory problems keep you from doing anything that requires standing for any length of time. Exercise — even walking at a moderate pace — can become nearly impossible when your feet are numb, tingling, or uncomfortably swollen. Even driving a car can be difficult if you’re dealing with circulatory problems that impact your feet. Small tasks that require holding an object, for example cutting up food with a knife, can be terribly difficult when your hands are freezing cold, numb, tingling, or swollen.

If poor circulation is causing you to miss out on your normal daily activities, it’s time to ask for help. With today’s highly advanced treatments, you don’t have to live this way any longer.

If you’re dealing with poor circulation, contact Georgia Vascular Institute at 770-506-4007 for help. As a referral center that aids in both diagnostics and treatment, we can help with everything from lifestyle change recommendations to surgery for poor circulation. Schedule an appointment online now!

uterine fibroids and pregnancy

How Uterine Fibroids Affect Pregnancy

Uterine fibroids are abnormal, non-cancerous growths that can appear in a woman’s uterus. The exact cause of their development is not known; however, some professionals believe it relates to a woman’s hormones or genes. Having yourself checked for uterine fibroids is an excellent precautionary choice to make being that numerous side effects can cause harm to your body. It is suggested to get checked for uterine fibroids because it is likely you might have them. In fact, some sources like UCLA Health claim these fibroids occur within 20 to 50 percent of women.

Why Do Uterine Fibroids Go Undetected?

Women are often unaware of having a uterine fibroid until an initial routine ultrasound is performed when expecting a child. This is because fibroids sometimes do not cause any symptoms. Although they are quite common, it is unusual for the fibroids to cause any complications during a woman’s pregnancy. If symptoms are present, they most often are experienced by the mother and can display themselves as nausea, pain, fever, vomiting, and infrequently, as an elevation of white blood cells. Even though complications are rare with fibroids, it’s still wise to be aware of possible problems. Unfortunately, due to risks involved with the uterus bleeding more than normally, once a woman is pregnant, the fibroid cannot be removed.

Side Effects of Uterine Fibroids

As previously mentioned, pain from the fibroid is one symptom an expectant mother may experience, especially as the fibroid becomes larger. This growth is often caused in part by the fibroid’s response to progesterone and estrogen hormones, both of which increase dramatically during pregnancy. The location of the fibroid is another determination of possible complications, both during pregnancy and at delivery. The risk of complication increases if the fibroid is located directly next to the placenta, which can translate into a decrease in the blood supply to the fetus.

A lower than normal blood supply could cause a baby to be born at a lower than normal birth weight; this increases the likelihood of breathing problems and an abnormal body temperature in the newborn. In more severe cases, an early delivery may be warranted if the blood supply is extremely compromised. A C-section may also be necessary if the fibroid is positioned in a location close to the cervix and obstructs delivery or causes the baby to be in a breech position.

Conclusion

If you are pregnant, it is imperative to have yourself tested for uterine fibroids. Detecting the fibroids can be essential in choosing the appropriate delivery method for your child.

Georgia Vascular Institute is a referral center that can help with many types of health concerns. We can help with veins, fibroids, infertility, migraines, osteoporosis, cancer treatment, foot and leg ulcers, and many other conditions. Contact us anytime to learn more about how interventional radiology can help you. 

GVI patient who suffered from migraines but found relief

Patient Success Story: Finding My Migraines Puzzle Pieces

At Georgia Vascular Institute, we love to hear stories of success from our patients. In our latest testimony, patient Susan McManus tells her story of suffering from migraines for 18 years before visiting with Dr. Sendil Subramanian. Read more